Frid’Eh Update #47 Presented by 100%

By Jeff McConkey and Billy Rainford

Week #47 belongs to Ontario racer, Derek Ouimet. | Bigwave photo

Hello and welcome to Week #47 (we missed it last week due to the Mini O’s) of the DMX Frid’Eh Update Presented by 100%. It’s been a busy week around here at Direct Motocross. Jeff had an extremely busy week back here at home and I made my way back from the Mini O’s in Florida.

Because of this busy schedule, I wasn’t able to get out to the first couple weekends of competition in the Future West Moto Canadian Arenacross Championships, and I’m not happy about it at all. I’ll be sure to do whatever I can to make it out to the next block of racing after the break, February 1-2, and 8-9.

Anyway, Week #47 belongs to the rider we’ve gotten to know over the years who only raced a couple rounds of the 2018 Rockstar Triple Crown Motocross Series.

Derek Ouimet is from just north of Hamilton, in a small town called Carlisle off Highway #6.

Here’s a brief look at his 2018 summer:

Gopher Dunes:

Walton:

Derek didn’t get enough points to get a top 100 number for 2019. We got in touch with him for an interview. Here’s what the friendly rider had to say:

Derek is from Carlisle, ON and turned Pro back in 2013. | Bigwave photo

Direct Motocross: Hello, Derek. OK, let’s start at the beginning. Where are you from? How old are you? And how did you get into Motocross in the first place?

Derek Ouimet: Hi, Direct Motocross. I’m from Carlisle, Ontario, I’m 27 years old and I got into riding because my dad grew up riding. My parents got my brother and I trail bikes for Christmas one year and since there was snow on the ground they took us to an indoor track in Dunnville, Ontario. We were all so stoked they ended up taking us to the races the next summer.

What was your first number and how did you choose it?

51 –  because I liked the way it looked in the first moto magazine I saw.

What was your first race, and how did it go?

My first race was a CMX race at Eagles Nest in Ontario. I was on an XR 80 in the 85 (12-16) class. I think that says it all.

What was the highlight of your amateur career?

To be honest, I didn’t race too many big races as an amateur, just local ones. But once I got on big bikes we traveled more and I was normally battling with the guys up front so I was cool with that.

How did your Intermediate year go, and who were the top guys you were up against?

I was racing in Western New York when I turned Intermediate. Always had fun there and did well. There was always a lot of competition and Brandon Mays was winning the class. I eventually stopped going there and started racing CMRC races before I raced the Canadian nationals.

What year did you turn Pro and how did that season go?

I turned Pro in 2013. Would always qualify decent but when it came to the race I couldn’t keep’er together. I think it was a mind thing.

What was the highlight of your 2017 summer that earned you #47?

I got a 13th at Deschambault against some tough dudes. I have always had a good time at that track.

What is your favourite track in Canada?

I would have to say Mt. Thom in Nova Scotia — big jumps and wide open. I would only get to ride there once or twice a year when we traveled out east for the series.

Your best moto of last summer came at Gopher Dunes — a 29th. Can you take us through that one? Was it your best ride of the summer?

Definitely the best ride of the summer. One of the only rides, too. I had no expectations, I just wanted to ride and experience a couple gate drops with the big 47.

You ended up 102nd in Motocross with your best finish a 32nd overall at round 6 at Gopher Dunes. You only did Gopher Dunes and Walton, but can you sum up the summer for us? Are you happy with your results? 

Not stoked. But for how much training I put in I was excited just to qualify. It was good seeing all my friends I hadn’t seen all winter, too.

You just missed getting a top 100 number. What does that mean you’ll choose for a number in 2019?

518, 100%. I hope no one snipes that.

Will we see Derek at the races in 2019? Time will tell. | Bigwave photo

Were you ever planning on racing the Supercross portion? We haven’t seen you, where have you been?

No, Supercross is tight and I wasn’t riding enough so I didn’t think it was a good idea. If these Supercross races were going on when I was younger I’d be racing them for sure. Hamilton is only 20 minutes from me.

How do you think the first season under new ownership/management went?

I haven’t been around a lot but I would say great. Shout out to the Thompsons for taking it on, that’s a big job.

What are your winter plans?

Just work and do some snowboarding. Haven’t gone down south to ride over the winter for a couple years now.

What are your racing plans for next summer?

No plans for racing; if it happens, it happens. Just going to ride with my buddies when I can, go do things I wouldn’t normally do when you’re racing all summer.

What is it you do for your 9-5 job? What do you see yourself doing in the future?

I build vacuum trucks with Transway Systems. Any track owners out there who need a new water truck, hit me up and I will set you up with the coolest water truck in the industry!

OK, thank you and good luck. Who would you like to thank?

Thanks to Direct Motocross, my family, and all the friends I met on the way. We had fun.


This week is presented by 100%.


JEFF McCONKEY


Hey, Guys, Happy Friday.

Thor Winter Olympics/Mini O’s

The weather is pretty awful here in Southern, Ontario, if you are a motocrosser. It’s wet, it’s cold, and there is snow on the ground. This is usually the time where the serious racers pack up and head south for warmer weather, non-frozen dirt, and open motocross facilities.

The Mini O’s ran last week in Gainesville, Florida, and we had quite a few Canadians take part. If you have never been, I highly recommend that you get down to Gatorback at some point in your career. They run 2 portions, Supercross is first, on the toned-down SX track, and then motocross follows later in the week on the legendary outdoor MX track. The dirt is really good on both and both tracks offer a lot of fun for the beginners all the way up the the future stars of the sport.

An event like this will also open your eyes and let you know where you really fit in, in the scheme of things in the motocross talent rankings. I say this as I speak with many local ‘club racers’ and parents, and to be brutally honest, most of them think they are the next Ryan Dungey. Yes, it is sad but true, most local racers have no clue how much better the top kids are compared to local racers.

Everyone should hit up a race like the Mini O’s at least once. | Bigwave photo

Names like Jett Reynolds, Ryder DiFrancesco, Haiden Deegan (I refuse to call him “Danger Boy” because it is just the most ridiculous nickname ever!) just to name a few. These racers are already basically pro athletes. They are mini versions of the top stars of the sport at very young ages. And trust me, they will put it to any local kid out there.

Just because your kid had a few last-to-first rides in his local mx series, it doesn’t mean he’s the next big thing. This is Canada, and it is a very rare thing. Yes, we do have some great young talent coming through the ranks. A few names that jump out for me are Noah Viney, Jeremy McKie, Ryder McNabb, Sebastien Racine, and also Nathan Snelgrove.

Line up against the big dogs to see where you stand, like Jeremy and Bjorn Viney do. | Bogwave photo

These kids are on the gas, but they are also leaving the ‘small pond’ races and lining up against the best in the world. They are seeing where they fit in, and what is needed to close the gap to the top mini pilots. What I’m saying is, if you want to have some fun with motocross, and really challenge your skills, or your child’s, you really need to throw in an event like this every once and a while.

That is also why an event like the Walton TransCan is needed. Love it or hate it, it is the Crown Jewel of Canadian Motocross. This is the one event for amateurs that counts. Yes, our other events are good, and needed as well, but their ‘championships’ don’t hold the same as a Walton Championship.

Walton is the Canadian version of Loretta Lynn’s. It is the Grand Finale, and it should be the can’t miss race in our eyes. Ask any Americans, and the Canadian amateur race they know of is the Walton TransCan.

Yes, it is an expensive week, but this is where you as a racing family need to sit down and plan out your season. You need to budget your money and make sure you get to the races that count. Yes, gate drops are important to build your racer, but when you’re not dealing with an unlimited budget, you need to make the best of what you have.

I can not stress how important it is for us to support Walton, and help it grow once again. It will help Canadian Moto as a whole, and it will help elevate the talent in Canada. Congrats to the Canadians that made the trip South to compete.

Have a great weekend as we head into December, AMA SX is just over a month away. Stay warm and we will see you next week. #smileforBC!


BILLY RAINFORD


Thanks, Jeff. I know it’s been a stressful couple weeks for you back here in Canada while I was down in Florida. Having said that, the week-long events are no cup of tea for us media types. Early morning and late nights are the name of the game. They really make you miss the one-day events like the Pro Nationals. They’re easy in comparison.

I’m crazy at these things because I never let myself miss a single moto in case I miss something big. Also, I’m always terrified I’m going to miss a Canadian and then get home and someone message me saying I missed so and so all week! That would piss me off and break my heart. For example, I almost missed #409 Brennan Schofield from Nova Scotia because there was just a blank space in the spot where the hometown and country should be. Fortunately, Ryan Farris from the Maritimes gave me a mid-week heads up and I was able to track him down and snap a few late-week shot of him.

I almost missed the ‘Schofield Kid’ last week at the Mini O’s. Thanks, Ryan Farris. | Bigwave photo

Someone counted, and apparently the number of entries were up of the 2200 mark this year. That’s a great sign for the health of the sport. I’ve been there a couple times when the numbers were a little down and it got everyone nervous about what was going on. Fortunately, the trend is now for full gates in the youngest classes, and that’s great to see.

Like Jeff said, if you’ve never been down to one of the big US amateur nationals, you should really pen one into your calendar and make it a family trip. You will not regret the experience and memories you’ll make. My dad and I still laugh about the time we were down there racing in 1985 and went to a Gainesville mall for some greasy spoon breakfast.

The waitress asked us how everything was and he managed to mix up the order of the 3 simple words: Yes, great, thanks. Instead, out came, “Thanks…Great…Yes.” We had tears in our eyes from laughing so hard. Stupid, yes. Memorable, definitely.

Let’s not forget that I, as a dumb Canadian teenager, brought one sweatshirt with me from home in case it was cold at night or in the mornings. It was one I got from a buddy who was really into American College Football. It was a school from Florida’s name. Hmm, I wonder it it was the team from Gainesville or their arch rivals over in Tallahassee.

Yep, you guessed it, I walked around a mall in Gainesville wearing a Florida State sweatshirt. I had no idea why everyone was staring at me and looking like they wanted to punch me in the face. “I’m from Canada!” was all I had. I had no idea where Florida State was or that I was supposed to be wearing a Gators shirt. Live and learn, I suppose. Either way, it’s a memory and I still laugh about it.

My dad just shook his head. For the life of him, he couldn’t understand why a kid from London, Canada, would even need to wear a shirt celebrating a team from Florida in the first place, let alone bring it on a trip to Florida! He’s got a pretty good point.

Did I win? Hell no! I wasn’t even close in the B classes. I think I may have even got lapped by a couple of the leaders. It wasn’t my fault, though, I was on a pullout couch! It was a horrible bike, is what I’m trying to say. Not enough couches showed up to have our own class, I guess…

Don’t look now, but I think the #145 is leaving the inside wide open here at the Mini O’s back in 1985! | Bigwave Senior photo

Look at the difference from then and now! Wow, the track was concrete back then. They’ve brought in so much sand and good dirt that the track surface isn’t even recognizable as the same place! That looks more like Carlsbad. And it also predates the nice announcers’ tower, too. And I just went through a few photos to pick this one, and it also predates the big Dunlop tire.

But I digress…

Future West Moto Canadian Arenacross Championships

We’re back in Beaton’s Barn at the Heritage Park Arena in Chilliwack, BC tonight and Saturday for rounds 3 and 4 of the FWM Arenacross series.

There was some great racing last weekend and a few new names are scheduled to be on the track this week, including #9 Cade Clason and #620 Brad Nauditt.

Unfortunately, we’ve lost #63 Graham Scott due to a practice crash in the barn last Thursday night.

#63 Graham Scott Injury update

By Billy Rainford

Motocross is an extreme sport and can jump up and bite you when you least expect it. Case in point, Vancouver Island’s #63 Graham Scott is the most recent rider to be put on the injured list.

After signing on to ride for the Cycle North Honda team alongside fellow Islander Ryan Lalonde and American Collin Jurin (for Arenacross), Graham hit the ground hard while attending a late-night practice session for round 1 of the Future West Moto Canadian Arenacross Championships at Chilliwack Heritage Park in Chilliwack, BC.

We spoke with Graham Thursday afternoon from his home on the island and he confirmed he is out of action for the foreseeable future with his injuries.

As is tradition, teams and groups rent out the Heritage Park facility in the days leading up to and between the rounds. Cycle North had the track on Thursday night and Graham was on the track on his Honda 250F.

He said he didn’t really get his flow and that the track was a little awkward. There was a triple section where the 2nd hump was a little bigger than the other 2. Slower riders were jumping into it and bouncing over the third while the quicker riders were able to get over all 3 in one jump.

After taking a short break, Graham was back on the track and was on an easy lap when he entered the section. His front wheel cleared the 2nd jump but his rear wheel caught it and sent him over the bars and into the face of the 3rd jump.

He hit his face hard and then the bike came over and landed on him.

He needed stitches on his head and blew out his shoulder. He said he “got a black eye, immediately,” too. Fortunately, he has clear recollection of the crash and so a concussion isn’t an issue.

The initial x-rays have shown no breaks, but they will get more done as well as an ultra sound to determine the extent of the injury to his shoulder.

At this point, Graham is concerned about his rotator cuff and doesn’t want to get any more surgery, although it may be required.

Currently, his range of motion is at near zero and he’s been forced off from work because of it.

Said Graham, “I was feeling good on the little bike and finally got some good support and now this.” He added that, “In a perfect world, I’d be back for the early February rounds.”

The 22-year-old will head over to Chilliwack to watch his teammates race round 4 on Saturday night, but you could tell from his tone that watching is not something he enjoys doing.

Graham and Ryan will move back to the 450’s for the outdoors next season and he’s looking forward to recovering and getting some solid pre-season training in before the racing starts next spring.

He said he will know more on Tuesday, so we’ll be sure to get an update on the prognosis next week.

Heal up, Graham.

Here’s a look at the results and point standings after the first 2 rounds:

Friday

Pro Am Lights  View Points for this Class Points for this class
Overall Nbr Name Heat Moto 1 Moto 2 Points Earned
 1st  #3 Yamaha  SHAWN MAFFENBEIER
KAMLOOPS, BC
 1st
Heat 1
1st 1st 0
 2nd  #476 Kawasaki  COLLIN JURRIN
MONROE, WA
 2nd
Heat 2
2nd 2nd 22
 3rd  #216 KTM  DEVIN HARRIMAN
LONGVIEW, WA
 1st
Heat 2
1st 3rd 0
 4th  #101 Kawasaki  RYAN LOCKHART
LANGLEY, BC
 2nd
Heat 1
2nd 4th 18
 5th  #21 Honda  RYAN LALONDE
VICTORIA, BC
 4th
Heat 1
4th 5th 16
 6th  #17 Yamaha  CASEY KEAST
KELOWNA, BC
 3rd
Heat 2
7th 6th 0
 7th  #157 Husqvarna  WYATT WADDELL
DELTA, BC
 4th
Heat 2
3rd 7th 14
 8th  #621 Yamaha  KYLE SPRINGMAN
ABBOTSFORD, BC
 6th
Heat 1
6th 8th 13
 9th  #245 Husqvarna  RYLAN BLY
OKOTOKS, AB
 3rd
Heat 1
3rd 9th 0
 10th  #64 Husqvarna  PARKER EALES
MAPLE RIDGE, BC
 7th
Heat 2
5th 10th 11
 11th  #737 Yamaha  TEE PERROTT
 7th
Heat 1
7th 11th 0
 12th  #417 Yamaha  MARCUS DEAUSY
150 MILE HOUSE, BC
 8th
Heat 2
6th 12th 9
 13th  #337 Yamaha  REECE HAURELOCK
CALGARY, AB
 9th
Heat 2
9th 13th 0
 DNF  #545 Honda  RHYS DERKSEN
CHILLIWACK, BC
 5th
Heat 1
5th DNF 0
 DNS  #96 Yamaha  DYLAN DELAPLACE
LANGLEY, BC
 6th
Heat 2
4th DNS 0
 DNS  #146 Honda  TYLER GIBBS
MISSION, BC
 5th
Heat 2
8th DNS 0
Pro Open  View Points for this Class Points for this class
Overall Nbr Name Heat Moto 1 Moto 2 Points Earned
 1st  #476 Kawasaki  COLLIN JURRIN
MONROE, WA
 1st
Heat 2
1st 1st 25
 2nd  #3 Yamaha  SHAWN MAFFENBEIER
KAMLOOPS, BC
 1st
Heat 1
1st 2nd 0
 3rd  #216 KTM  DEVIN HARRIMAN
LONGVIEW, WA
 2nd
Heat 2
2nd 3rd 0
 4th  #197 Kawasaki  BROCK LEITNER
 3rd
Heat 2
3rd 4th 0
 5th  #101 Kawasaki  RYAN LOCKHART
LANGLEY, BC
 2nd
Heat 1
2nd 5th 16
 6th  #157 Husqvarna  WYATT WADDELL
DELTA, BC
 5th
Heat 1
5th 6th 15
 7th  #21 Honda  RYAN LALONDE
VICTORIA, BC
 4th
Heat 2
4th 7th 14
 8th  #621 Yamaha  KYLE SPRINGMAN
ABBOTSFORD, BC
 4th
Heat 1
4th 8th 13
 9th  #64 Husqvarna  PARKER EALES
MAPLE RIDGE, BC
 5th
Heat 2
5th 9th 12
 10th  #245 Husqvarna  RYLAN BLY
OKOTOKS, AB
 7th
Heat 2
7th 10th 0
 11th  #737 Yamaha  TEE PERROTT
 6th
Heat 2
6th 11th 0
 12th  #337 Yamaha  REECE HAURELOCK
CALGARY, AB
 6th
Heat 1
6th 12th 0
 DNS  #146 Honda  TYLER GIBBS
MISSION, BC
 3rd
Heat 1
3rd DNS 0
 DNS  #17 Yamaha  CASEY KEAST
KELOWNA, BC
 DNS
Heat 1
DNS DNS 0

Saturday

Pro Am Lights  View Points for this Class Points for this class
Overall Nbr Name Heat Moto 1 Moto 2 Points Earned
 1st  #3 Yamaha  SHAWN MAFFENBEIER
KAMLOOPS, BC
 1st
Heat 2
1st 1st 0
 2nd  #476 Kawasaki  COLLIN JURRIN
MONROE, WA
 1st
Heat 1
1st 2nd 22
 3rd  #216 KTM  DEVIN HARRIMAN
LONGVIEW, WA
 2nd
Heat 2
2nd 3rd 0
 4th  #101 Kawasaki  RYAN LOCKHART
LANGLEY, BC
 2nd
Heat 1
2nd 4th 18
 5th  #245 Husqvarna  RYLAN BLY
OKOTOKS, AB
 6th
Heat 2
6th 5th 0
 6th  #157 Husqvarna  WYATT WADDELL
DELTA, BC
 3rd
Heat 1
3rd 6th 15
 7th  #621 Yamaha  KYLE SPRINGMAN
ABBOTSFORD, BC
 5th
Heat 1
5th 7th 14
 8th  #17 Yamaha  CASEY KEAST
KELOWNA, BC
 3rd
Heat 2
3rd 8th 0
 9th  #21 Honda  RYAN LALONDE
VICTORIA, BC
 4th
Heat 1
4th 9th 12
 10th  #64 Husqvarna  PARKER EALES
MAPLE RIDGE, BC
 6th
Heat 1
6th 10th 11
 11th  #737 Yamaha  TEE PERROTT
 4th
Heat 2
4th 11th 0
 12th  #888 KTM  BURG GILIOMEE
COQUITLAM, BC
 7th
Heat 1
7th 12th 9
 DNF  #417 Yamaha  MARCUS DEAUSY
150 MILE HOUSE, BC
 5th
Heat 2
5th DNF 0
 DNS  #337 Yamaha  REECE HAVRELOCK
CALGARY, AB
 7th
Heat 2
7th DNS 0
Pro Open View Points for this Class Points for this class
Overall Nbr Name Heat Moto 1 Moto 2 Points Earned
 1st  #476 Kawasaki  COLLIN JURRIN
MONROE, WA
 1st
Heat 1
1st 1st 25
 2nd  #3 Yamaha  SHAWN MAFFENBEIER
KAMLOOPS, BC
 1st
Heat 2
1st 2nd 0
 3rd  #216 KTM  DEVIN HARRIMAN
LONGVIEW, WA
 2nd
Heat 1
2nd 3rd 0
 4th  #197 Kawasaki  BROCK LEITNER
 3rd
Heat 1
3rd 4th 0
 5th  #157 Husqvarna  WYATT WADDELL
DELTA, BC
 2nd
Heat 2
2nd 5th 16
 6th  #101 Kawasaki  RYAN LOCKHART
LANGLEY, BC
 4th
Heat 1
4th 6th 15
 7th  #21 Honda  RYAN LALONDE
VICTORIA, BC
 4th
Heat 2
4th 7th 14
 8th  #245 Husqvarna  RYLAN BLY
OKOTOKS, AB
 3rd
Heat 2
3rd 8th 0
 9th  #621 Yamaha  KYLE SPRINGMAN
ABBOTSFORD, BC
 DNF
Heat 1
DNF 9th 12
 10th  #737 Yamaha  TEE PERROTT
 5th
Heat 2
5th 10th 0
 11th  #64 Husqvarna  PARKER EALES
MAPLE RIDGE, BC
 5th
Heat 1
5th 11th 10

POINTS (Only riders with FWM license are scored for points)

Pro Am Lights 
Place – Name
Number – Hometown
11/23/2018
Finish
11/24/2018
Finish
Total Points
1st – COLLIN JURRIN
#476 – MONROE, WA
2nd 2nd 44
2nd – RYAN LOCKHART
#101 – LANGLEY, BC
4th 4th 36 (-8)
3rd – WYATT WADDELL
#157 – DELTA, BC
7th 6th 29 (-15)
4th – RYAN LALONDE
#21 – VICTORIA, BC
5th 9th 28 (-16)
5th – KYLE SPRINGMAN
#621 – ABBOTSFORD, BC
8th 7th 27 (-17)
6th – PARKER EALES
#64 – MAPLE RIDGE, BC
10th 10th 22 (-22)
7th – BURG GILIOMEE
#888 – COQUITLAM, BC
12th 9 (-35)
7th – MARCUS DEAUSY
#417 – 150 MILE HOUSE, BC
12th DNF 9 (-35)
Pro Open 
Place – Name
Number – Hometown
11/23/2018
Finish
11/24/2018
Finish
Total Points
1st – COLLIN JURRIN
#476 – MONROE, WA
1st 1st 50
2nd – WYATT WADDELL
#157 – DELTA, BC
6th 5th 31 (-19)
2nd – RYAN LOCKHART
#101 – LANGLEY, BC
5th 6th 31 (-19)
4th – RYAN LALONDE
#21 – VICTORIA, BC
7th 7th 28 (-22)
5th – KYLE SPRINGMAN
#621 – ABBOTSFORD, BC
8th 9th 25 (-25)
6th – PARKER EALES
#64 – MAPLE RIDGE, BC
9th 11th 22 (-28)

Geneva Supercross

You can watch it live on YouTube here. Racing is Friday and Saturday night.

(Scroll back to watch the action)

AZ Open Motocross

If you’re looking for more motocross action, you can check out the AZ Open MX racing from Arizona. Here are the recaps from the past couple days.

And LIVE here:

OK, that’s all we really have for you this week. We’ve been busy trying to recap all our Candian’s weeks at the Mini O’s. We’ve got a few more all ready to post, so I’ll end this here and do that now.

Have a great weekend. I also know that Gopher Dunes is planning to open this Sunday for a one-off day of practice, since it’s forecast to be 10 degrees in their area of Ontario. If you’re in the Courtland area, head on over!

Hard to believe he went out and got that gear dirty. See you at the races…